Slow-Moving Superload Set to Move through Northwest Region Delayed Due to Weather


The “superload” is 213 feet long and weighs 294 tons.

Photo courtesy of the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation


Oil City, PA – The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) is providing motorists with an update on the movement of a superload being transported from West Milton, New York to Wampum, Pennsylvania.

Due to recent, intense wintry weather, the superload is not expected to move overnight tonight. At the earliest, the transport will continue its journey after 10:00 PM Wednesday, January 19. Weather permitting, it will travel from Elk County to Route 66 in Forest County to Route 322 in Clarion County into Venango County.

From there it is expected to travel on Route 62 in Venango County to Route 173 in Mercer County to Interstate 80 to Ohio, as part of a more than 400-mile journey across the state. The superload is 213 feet long and weighs 294 tons.

The superload will move like a rolling slowdown using two traffic lanes which will result in traffic stoppages and travel delays. The majority of the transport, currently scheduled to be completed on January 23, will take place during nighttime hours. Movement could be impacted or delayed by winter weather. Perkins Specialized Transportation Contracting of Becker, Minnesota will transport the load.

The superload travel plan involves 16 counties and features ramp maneuvers, unusual traffic patterns, and slow-moving vehicles. Drivers should remain alert for this slow-moving, two-lane operation, which will travel at the posted speed limit or 30 mph—whichever is lower.

Department updates on the superload’s travel can be followed on social media with the #PAsuperload22 hashtag.

Motorists are encouraged to “Know Before They Go” by checking conditions on more than 40,000 roadway miles by visiting www.511PA.com. 511PA, which is free and available 24 hours a day, provides traffic delay warnings, weather forecasts, traffic speed information, and access to more than 1,000 traffic cameras.

The superload travel route.

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